Moby Dick

Moby Dick Summary

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is a novel by Herman Melville, first published in 1851. It is considered to be one of the Great American Novels. The story tells the adventures of wandering sailor Ishmael, and his voyage on the whaleship Pequod, commanded by Captain Ahab. Ishmael soon learns that Ahab has one purpose on this voyage: to seek out Moby Dick, a ferocious, enigmatic white sperm whale. In a previous encounter, the whale destroyed Ahab's boat and bit off his leg, which now drives Ahab to take revenge.
In Moby-Dick, Melville employs stylized language, symbolism, and metaphor to explore numerous complex themes. Through the journey of the main characters, the concepts of class and social status, good and evil, and the existence of God are all examined, as the main characters speculate upon their personal beliefs and their places in the universe. The narrator's reflections, along with his descriptions of a sailor's life aboard a whaling ship, are woven into the narrative along with Shakespearean literary devices, such as stage directions, extended soliloquies, and asides. The book portrays destructive obsession and monomania, as well as the assumption of anthropomorphism.



Book Reviews

archilny

Worst edited book I ever read1 star

The only thing almost as terrible as killing whales is reading this book. Terribly edited book. No idea how this book is considered a classic and no wonder it was deemed a failure when first published.15

Zhamir Harper

!! SO ADDICTING !!5 star

Very good book took me just a few weeks to read55

rossandbeth

Ruin comes in many ways4 star

A great story of destruction on a great animal, ruins the lives of the men that chase glory but find emptiness in there quest.45

RPG BRO 425

Láck °85 star

Love it55

Trees am

Best book I have ever read!5 star

How will I ever find a book that comes even close to such a fantastic book. This is my #1 book of my long list of favorite books.55



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